News

Choosing Your Disciples

By  | 

We should not be in authority unless we have learned and proven we can produce while under authority.

Quoting one of my spiritual fathers, Dr. Cole has often said, “God’s methods are men. While men look for better methods, God looks for better men.” How should we choose our twelve men? Like Jesus did: one at a time.

As leaders, choosing whom to pour ourselves into is an extremely important decision. It’s even more important considering that the rest of the flock will line up under them. We cannot base our decisions on who has been a Christian the longest, who has given the most financial support, or who would be appalled if they were not asked to be in the group. We need to start with twelve men who possess the heart and spirit of a leader.

“Moreover thou shalt provide out of all people able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating covetousness; and place such over them, to be rulers of thousands, and rulers of hundreds, rulers of fifties, and rulers of tens: And let them judge the people at all seasons: and it shall be, that every great matter they shall bring unto thee, but every small matter they shall judge: so shall it be easier for thyself, and they shall bear the burden with thee. If thou shalt do this thing, and God command thee so, then thou shalt be able to endure, and all this people shall also go to their place in peace.” These are the kinds of men a leader needs to seek. Faithful men, fair and godly men, men of truth. These are real leaders.

I have found it to be true that “some people make things happen, some people watch what happens and some people wonder what happened.” The “Majoring in Men” curriculum teaches that leaders determine to influence while followers only happened to influence. If a mentoring strategy is going to work, the leader needs men in his group who are determined to make a difference.

By implementing this strategy, motives are exposed. Men in search of personal recognition will not want to humble themselves under a mentor. Men who are double-minded will not like the accountability mentoring brings. “Good ole’ boys” who are only out to impress the pastor tend to shy away from the responsibility of caring for other church members. Men who only “play church” resent the fact that mentoring requires them to bear fruit.

One thing is for sure, the G-MEN strategy “separates the men from the boys.” The leader’s job is to choose twelve Christlike men, then equip them to be even better leaders, so they can go back and train up the boys. “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” Matthew 28:19

I like the following anonymous statements about the difference between winners and whiners. They always encourage me.

When winners make a mistake, they say, “I was wrong;” when whiners make a mistake, they say, “It wasn’t my fault.”

A winner works harder than a whiner and has more time; a whiner is always “too busy” to do what is necessary.

A winner goes through a problem; a whiner goes around it and never gets past it.

A winner makes and keeps commitments; a whiner makes and forgets promises.

A winner says, “I’m good, but not as good as I ought to be;” a whiner says, “I’m not as bad as a lot of other people.”

Winners listen; whiners just wait until it’s their turn to talk.

Winners respect those who are in authority over them and try to learn something from them; whiners resent those who are superior to them and try to find chinks in their armor.

Winners feel responsible for more than their job; whiners say, “I only work here.”

A winner says, “There ought to be a better way to do this;” whiners say, “That’s the way it’s always been done here.”

Please join us at PowerHouse Church Sundays at 9am & 11am to hear more about the G-Men Strategy.

Keep Pressing,
GFW

You must be logged in to post a comment Login